Project title

Nasal high flow oxygen therapy in COPD patients reduces respiratory rate and tissue carbon dioxide whilst increasing tidal and end-expiratory lung volumes: a randomised crossover trial.

Researchers

Fraser, JF., Spooner, AJ., Dunster, KR., Anstey, CM, Corley, A


Background


Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death worldwide. In addition to generating high healthcare costs, COPD imposes a significant burden in terms of disability and impaired quality of life.

 

Oxygen as a therapeutic agent was first introduced by Alvin Barach in 1922 and since then it has become an important form of home therapy for hypoxic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oxygen is neither warmed nor humidified and high flows of cold dry gas are uncomfortable and may lead to airway obstruction by thickened secretions.

 

An alternative therapy now available is a high flow of humidified air, that can be enriched with oxygen, and delivered by a comfortable nasal cannula (Optiflow). This high flow humidification therapy has been successfully trialled in a long-term study in New Zealand on COPD patients which showed a lowering of exacerbations, improved lung function and quality of life, and high compliance.

Research Plan


This randomised crossover physiological study aims to assess the feasibility of employing the AIRVO system as an adjunct to conventional oxygen delivery systems in COPD patients.

We aim to establish if AIRVO:

  • reduces respiratory rate
  • improves oxygenation
  • improves subjective scoring of dyspnoea
  • increases tidal volume and end expiratory lung volume

Publications


Fraser, JF., Spooner, AJ., Dunster, KR., Anstey, CM, Corley, A. Nasal high flow oxygen therapy in COPD patients reduces respiratory rate and tissue carbon dioxide whilst increasing tidal and end-expiratory lung volumes: a randomised crossover trial. Accepted by Thorax journal.